Part III: Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System

When I ask clients what they want to achieve from a nutrition consultation, it is common to hear, “I want more energy”. This tells me the person needs to start with the nutrition basics and heal from the ground up.

Nutritionally, healing from the ground up is a matter of acknowledging and using appropriate building blocks that foster good health.

The building blocks are simple and few: drink pure water, eat pure food that supports your biochemical individuality (free of chemicals, additives or preservatives), breathe fresh air, and find a balance between movement and relaxation.

Factors that contribute to good health are often learned from family, friends, and society.

Factors that contribute to ill-health and interfere with the ability to use appropriate buildings blocks that foster good health are also often connected to health pattern learned from family, friends, and society.

Your life experiences and what you’ve been taught along the way has the potential to color your perspective and decision-making ability in regard to your health.

A question to consider: Are you making food choices from an emotional, mental, spiritual or intuitive place?

When you make food choices from an emotional place, you connect eating certain foods to social situations. This is where family traditions come into play, or pizza night with friends. For example, you might enjoy eating a Wendy’s cheeseburger because it is familiar and you have memories of having lunch with your Grandmother there, or you might make a certain meal because it is a traditional meal learned from family.

When you make food choices from a mental place, you rely on media to inform you about diet trends and nutrition protocols. As someone who “follows the rules” you apply what you have read or learned about nutrition from the media to your own life. An example would be someone who follows current diets like a gluten-free diet or a Paleo diet because it is part of a trend (even though these diets are great for many people).

When you make food choices from a spiritual place, you may be connected to a particular philosophy or dogma that you feel loyal too. You might add or eliminate foods based on religious/spiritual/dogmatic principle. For example, you might modify your diet as part of a religious observance or follow a particular food philosophy such as veganism.

When you make food choices from an intuitive place, you eat with intention. You listen to your hunger cues and work with the building blocks of health to sustain your body. Food choices and meal planning are based on what your body needs to eat and thrive. You pay attention to how your energy feels.

When you consider the chakras, healing from ground up begins with Root Chakra.

Do you want to learn more about the Chakra System, nutrition and the role intuition plays with your health? Friday, May 23rd is the last day to register the class, Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System. Follow this link to sign up: Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System.  

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Part II: Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System

For thousands of years, ancient medical systems such as Ayurvedic Medicine and Chinese Medicine have recognized that fine tuning energy flow is the key to maintain a healthy body, mind, and spirit. The quality of your energy, or life force, is the most important factor to consider when it is time to make some changes and improve your health.

Working with the chakras can be a useful tool to help maintain energy flow and to create much-needed balance. As an energetic super highway, the Chakra System creates a convenient blue print that has much to say about what is happening with your entire body.

When you feel sluggish, tired, depressed, overweight, constipated, bloated, or unable to make decisions in your life — these are signs that you are dealing with a foundational issue or potential dysfunction that affects the Root Chakra.

Each chakra is attached to:

Physical Health — A specific gland of the Endocrine System is associated with each chakra as well as specific organs in the body.

Emotional and Psychological Health — Certain characteristics are associated with each chakra and your personal story has much to say about how to improve the health of each chakra.

Potential Blockages and Dysfunction — What is happening with you physically, emotionally or mentally act as clues to inform you about the function of your chakras. Once you are given information you can make an informed decision about your health and take responsibility for potential blockages or dysfunction.

A Particular Color from Nature — Ayurvedic doctors counsel that we are influenced by the vibration of the food that we eat, so a particular color is thought to raise or lower your vibration (energy). A particular color from nature is attached to each chakra and has the ability to heal it.

Working with chakras is an intuitive and proactive approach to your health. When you work to incorporate chakra information with your whole body, you initiate the healing process.

Root Chakra – The Foundation

Symbolically, the Root Chakra connects you to the Earth. Your concerns about physical and material survival are addressed here. For those of you who study psychology it is the base of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. You cannot thrive unless your essential needs are met. If your foundation has cracks, you can expect to see dysfunction in other chakras as well.

Physically, the Root Chakra is located at the base of your spine (there are also chakras that are located in the soles of your feet). Any potential dysfunction can be connected to your bones: spinal column, legs, feet — your rectum, Immune System, Adrenal Glands and Circulatory System also show up here.

Psychologically and Emotionally, When general information about the Root Chakra is applied to your nutrition and health you are working on: trusting your food choices, body image, as well as will power and the ability to create boundaries. How you perceive the Earth is also important. Appreciation for where your food comes from as well as where and how it grows can be addressed at the Root Chakra level. Our family rituals and traditions with food are also explored here.

The Root Chakra asks us to shine light on our family of origin, our history and ultimately take responsibility for creating the changes that our health deems necessary for survival.

Some questions to consider: What did you learn from family about physical and material survival? How was money viewed in your household? Was there an abundance of food or was food scarcity a concern? Did your family care about the source of your food? Was your family interested in buying quality ingredients or growing your own food? 

Do you want to learn more about the Chakra System, nutrition and the role intuition plays with your health? Friday, May 23rd is the last day to register for the class, Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System. Follow this link to sign up: Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System.

 

 

Part I: Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System

Sound nutrition has people so confused. The media says one thing, your neighbor says another, and your doctor says something else – Why has eating a balanced diet become so complicated? Andy why have people placed the power to decide what is right for them in someone else’s hands? Is it possible that you are looking for answer from  people or using resources that are not right for you? Why is this?

As a holistic nutritionist, part of my work is to educate clients about sound nutrition, but I don’t push a particular philosophy, I always leave room for intuition and I respect what is right for you – what is your food philosophy? How has your food philosophy evolved over time as you have received new information?

When I educate clients about sound nutrition I give an array of choices – not just one nutrition model to choose from. Eating well looks different to everyone, that’s why one nutrition plan does not work for every person. I respect each person’s biochemical individuality. The client is always in the driver’s seat, as a passenger, I co-create nutrition plans that help and heal.

This June, I will be teaching a class with the Wellspring School for Healing Arts, called Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System. This class offers another choice, another food philosophy or model that may work for you. If learning information about using your intuition, exploring multiple food philosophies and learning about the Chakra System and how this information can help you lead a healthier, happier, and more productive life resonates, then I think this class will be for you.

Some of you may need a little more information. I hope to fill in the gaps in the coming weeks touching on a few questions that I’ve received so far. The following post will offer some Chakra 101.

What are the Chakras?

Practitioners of one of the oldest medical systems, Ayurveda, continue to rely on information about the Chakras to treat people, recognizing that you have to look much deeper and work from the root if you want to create real changes with health. A proactive nutrition protocol respects this as well. Health plans must treat the whole person,  improvements on the physical plane are often made when you also address what is happening emotionally, mentally, and energetically.

The Chakras are considered to be seven energy centers in the body that follow the spine connecting our physical body with our emotional, psychological, and spiritual bodies – they are interdependent – the health of one chakra depends on the health of all the others. The Chakras are known as the Root, Sacral, Solar Plexus, Heart, Throat, Third Eye and Crown Chakra.

Each chakra is considered to be a circular sphere that whirls on its own axis – the speed of each is dependant on the quality of energy (or light) that is present in our environment – our thoughts, the people in our communities the quality of our air, food, and water supply all have an effect on the health of our chakras.

A healthy chakra system is moving – the speed depends on the amount of energy you have and the quality of light has a special significance as we get much of our energy from the sun as a heat source and fuel for our natural world to grow. Food choices of the full color spectrum play a significant role in the health of our chakras because light is so significant to the health of the chakras – a color from nature is connected to each chakra.

Are your wheels spinning?

The Chakra system is interdependent relying on the body, emotions, mind and spirit to work harmoniously. If your mind is healthy you continue to think positively and move forward, if that energy is blocked, you stay right where you are, or continue to spin your metal wheels wondering what direction you should be heading in.

Each chakra has specific physical, emotional, and psychological attributes that are able to give us clues about the state of our health. When the chakras are out of balance they are considered to be overactive, under active, or blocked.

Whether you believe the chakras to be actual whirling disks in your body or you choose to view the chakras location as a metaphor to teach you about your health there is something to be learned.

If you would like to read more about my class offering or register for the class, you can do so here: Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System.

I welcome questions and comments from the generally curious or prospective students in the comments section below.

Upcoming class: Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System

I’m excited to announce in June of 2014, I will be teaching a class with the Wellspring School for Healing Arts that explores nutrition, intuition and the Chakra System. As a holistic nutritionist, I feel particularly passionate about this combination of disciplines.

The class will be held on 3 consecutive Wednesday evenings from 5:30 PM till 8 PM on June 11th, June 18th and June 25th.

The cost of the class is $125 but you can get an early bird discount ($25 off) if you register by May 11th.

You can register for this 3-day workshop directly with the Wellspring School for Healing Arts. Here is a link to read about and register for the class: Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System.

Is there room for intuition in your healthcare plan?

Some of you may wonder: What role does intuition play in my healthcare plan?

At the present time, many healthcare plans do not recognize intuition as an important part of decision-making that can lead to improved health – but shouldn’t it be? Isn’t it your intuition that encourages you to make the necessary changes that lead to improved health? Isn’t it your intuition that encourages you to make an appointment to see a specialist when you see signs of ill-health?

Coming from a holistic health perspective, I believe that your intuition continuously gives you clues about what you should be doing to keep yourself well. Sometimes people just need a little help finding that voice and the ability to recognize that the voice is saying something of tremendous value.

Are you ready to learn how to listen and respond to what your intuition is telling you?

In the 3-day workshop, Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System, the following questions will be explored:

What is the Chakra System? How can information about the Chakra System help with your overall health? How does the Chakra System relate to nutrition? Which foods are thought to support the Chakra System? What is intuition?  How do you use or enhance your intuition in regard to making appropriate food choices?

What will students learn in this class?

This class will focus on the qualities of each Chakra and which foods are thought to balance each system. While exploring the Chakra System we will focus on developing an intuitive sensibility using tools for exploration and self discovery – some possibilities include: tarot, creative visualization, meditation, and movement. A variety of food philosophies will be explored as they relate to each of the Chakras.

This class is experiential and it will be important to come to class prepared to interact and share!

If you are a student who is interested in taking the class, questions are welcome in the comments section.

A Day of Renewal in Portland, Oregon

I will be co-hosting (as Eat to Live Nutrition and Tarot for the Times) a space-limited retreat called, A Day of Renewal, with Dr. Louise Rose ND of Rose Cabinet Medicine on Saturday, April 27th, from 11 AM to 5 PM.
The retreat will be a daylong event with a potpourri of relaxing and rejuvenating options such as: detoxification, energy healing, body work, water therapy, holistic nutrition, intuitive development, and stress management.
This event would make an excellent gift for someone in need of some TLC. Is it you? Don’t miss it! If you know someone who might be interested, please share this event.

A Day of Renewal at Rose Cabinet Medicine

 with Dr. Louise Rose & Traci Goodrich

 image of day of renewal             

What new seeds of possibility do you want to plant in your life this spring?         

Which areas of your health do you want to explore?

If you had more energy what would you do with it?

Are you ready for a change?

Come for a day of renewal and to rediscover what wellness feels like. 

When + Where + Cost:

Saturday, April 27th, 11 AM – 5 PM

Rose Cabinet Medicine, 2135 NE 55th Avenue, Portland, OR 97213

The total cost is $230. $115 will reserve your spot at this space-limited retreat. The remaining amount is due in full by April 15th. Contact Dr. Louise Rose to pay. 503-308-8608 Cash, check, or credit cards are accepted.

Weight Management Class at Sunnyside Holistic Group

Focused on Food: Finding a Weight that is Healthy for You

A busy lifestyle doesn’t have to lead to poor eating habits, weight gain and frustration. Instead of committing to a fad diet for the new year, commit to a new way of eating by learning about real food that supports the health of your body and learn about the foods that might be sabotaging your best efforts. This class will teach you the fundamentals of whole foods nutrition and steps that you can take to create a plan that is right for you. Everyone is an individual. Learn more about what your body needs to feel better, look younger and have more energy for yourself and to share with others in 2011!

When:

Tuesday, January 18th, 6:00 to 7:30

Where:

Sunnyside Holistic Group, 2450 SE Belmont, Portland, OR 97214

Cost:

$35 To secure a slot in class, registration payment must be received by January 16th.

Payment options:

PayPal, Cash or checks are also accepted.

Make checks payable to Traci Goodrich.

Sunnyside Holistic Group
2450 SE Belmont                                                                                                                                                                                                 Portland, OR 97214

Contact:

Traci Goodrich, NTP at 503.233.7064 or etlnutrition@gmail.com

***Discount Winter Wellness Special on Nutrition Consultation Services:

15% discount on nutrition consultation services through the month of January.

Fall Class with Sunnyside Holistic Group

Recently, I joined a wellness center called the Sunnyside Holistic Group. I will be meeting with clients and teaching classes at this new location. On Monday, October 25th, from 6 PM to 8 PM, I will be teaching a nutrition class in the community room of this new location. Please read further if you are interested in participating in the class!

 

The Necessary Evils: Sugar, Salt and Fat

 Are sugar, salt and fat indulgences or are they necessary to life? Do you want to learn about eating real food that actually supports the health of your body, and also tastes good? Are you tired of being on a diet that simply does not work? Part nutrition education and part cooking demonstration, students will learn how to eat to maintain good health and vitality.  A food demonstration with samples will be provided based on recipes and meal plans created by the instructor. Students will leave with a packet of information to assist in their transition to eating healthier traditional food.

When:  Monday, October 25th, 6 PM to 8 PM

Where:  Sunnyside Holistic Group, 2450 SE Belmont

Contact:  Traci Goodrich, NTP

503.233.7064 or etlnutrition@gmail.com      

Cost:  $35  Class size is limited. Registration is required.

Community Supported Kitchens and Public Demand

“Peasant food has been the smartest, thriftiest, and most nourishing food available to us. Simple, seasonal, and regional foods are what we are meant to live on.”
Tressa Yellig
chef and proprietor of Community Supported Kitchen (CSK), Salt, Fire and Time

The local food culture in Portland, Oregon
Portland, Oregon has a thriving local food culture. It’s no wonder, with a 12-month grow season and some of the most fertile soil in the country. Local farmers benefit from the supply and demand created by the general public. Renegade chefs are flocking in droves to the Willamette Valley, to be part of a food revolution that offers quality ingredients to the local consumer. With a variety of purveyors to choose from, Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) and Portland Farmers Market offerings abound, providing chefs with the raw materials to support a population of people who are demanding local, seasonal and organic food.
It is the existence of this local food culture and the support of the regional agricultural system that drew local chef and proprietor of Community Supported Kitchen (CSK), Salt, Fire and Time to the area. Recently, I had the opportunity to speak with Tressa Yellig about community supported kitchens, how she got her start and why people should be supporting the four CSK’s that are in existence.
CSK defined
Yellig explains, the technical definition of community supported kitchen is, “a community scale model for food preparation” and that this is the only common link between the four community supported kitchens that exist in the United States today. As sole proprietor of Salt, Fire and Time, with a handful of volunteers, Yellig has her hands full cooking nutrient-rich food for 30+ families, teaching classes, and hosting events, not to mention the recent addition of a low-key cafe that is volunteer-run. The cafe offers a small selection of simple, traditionally-prepared foods that nourish. Think of a plate with dense bread and homemade butter, flavorful sauerkraut with texture and an egg made your way and you have the idea.
Yellig’s influences, and how she got her start as a chef
Yellig credits her grandmother, who was a traditional German chef, as among her first culinary influences. Yellig claims that it was not a participatory process in the kitchen, as her grandmother maintained secrecy, and did not divulge trade-secrets, as family recipes were a prized possession. Yellig also credits her uncle, who was a farmer, as a significant influence.
Although Yellig acknowledges her family experience as playing a significant role in the development of her food philosophy, she also comments on the process of educating herself, acknowledging the Slow Foods movement and the Weston A. Price Foundation, as fundamental sources of information, and Sally Fallon’s Nourishing Traditions cookbook.
In New York, Yellig complemented her self-education by working for herbalists and attending the Natural Gourmet Institute. Yellig explains that she had the desire to do work that was healing, and at one point, thought about becoming a naturopathic doctor before attending the Natural Gourmet Institute.
Although the Natural Gourmet Institute, in some ways, formalized her education as a chef, Yellig recognized that she really had already learned the fundamentals of cooking well before she attended this school, and credits her personal experiences, mentors and the learning that she did on her own, as being a substantial part of her education. The Natural Gourmet Institute provided her with some valuable contacts and the opportunity to intern at Three Stone Hearth and work with Natural Gourmet Institute alumni and mentor, Jessica Prentice.
In the trenches
From New York, Yellig headed west to do an internship with Three Stone Hearth, a community supported kitchen in Berkley, California, and the first of its kind. Positively influenced by the Full Moon feast series, established by Jessica Prentice, Yellig was able to learn by watching and participating in a large scale operation that provided feasts for 50 to 100 people at a time. The labor was volunteer-based, and the business model supported 5 worker-owners full time. Yellig explained that the start-up money for this business was established with private donation-based funding and the great success of this business was in the excellent reputation of the worker-owners, and the community-based resources the chefs were able to access. According to Yellig, this cooperative was not only able to pay back $100,000 of borrowed money but able to pay themselves a salary within 1 year’s time, which is incredible for any business in their first year.
From here, Yellig went on to do formal paid work as an Executive Chef in Mendocino, leaving her volunteer kitchen manager position with Three Stone Hearth in Berkeley. As Executive Chef for this restaurant, community-minded Yellig worked with local purveyors and farmers to create meals for the public. These connections in the community led her to become the manager of the local farmers market and to become better connected with the agricultural community.
All points head north
From California, Yellig witnessed the migration of great chefs as they ran to the promised land. As a smaller city, with an already thriving food scene, Portland became popular. Access to local food, was a public demand. In similar fashion, Yellig chose Portland to be the location of Salt, Fire and Time because of the already established community support, and existing scene that was largely supported by the public. Yellig also noted the lower cost of living and the lack of taxation as being incentives to move.
Existing Community Supported Kitchens

To sustain CSK’s as a movement, the public will have to be involved. Yellig invites the consumer to participate in the “life cycle of the business” by supporting 1 of the 4 CSK’s in existence, and to engage in a community movement. If you want to get to know know Salt, Fire and Time stop by the kitchen and make yourself known.
Check out a CSK near you:
Salt, Fire and Time (Portland, OR)
Sweet Deliverance(New York, NY)
Three Stone Hearth (Berkeley, CA)
Some reasons why you should support your local CSK
The food purchased through a CSK is often the best use for your “eating out” food dollars.
The food purchased through a CSK is nutrient-rich, meaning, you are getting your vitamins and minerals, without using a supplement.
The food purchased through a CSK is traditional, and good for what ails you. Just ask your Grandmother, who had the right idea by placing sauerkraut beside the sausage on your plate.
The food purchased through a CSK is local, seasonal, and organic, thus it supports regional agriculture, the systems of the body as well as your local community.
The food purchased through a CSK supports your own good health and that of your family.
The food purchased through a CSK saves you time, which benefits the working public.
The food purchased through a CSK saves you money. As businesses, CSK’s benefit from wholesale discounts; a soup that would cost $34 dollars to make at home, only costs you $16 from a CSK. Your food dollars go into long term food costs, with better quality ingredients that would cost you 2x’s as much in the store.
And last but not least, the food purchased through a CSK allows you the opportunity to support revolutionary changes that are occurring in regard to food culture. As a consumer, you are demanding a higher quality product, thus making other food providers stand up and take notice, and supply the same quality ingredients. The principles of supply and demand are simple: as a consumer, if you demand high quality health-supporting food, you will get it, and at a cheaper price, because of the competitive market we live in.

Food for Flight


I don’t like my food to come in plastic shrink-wrap or to be served on TV dinner-style trays. So, what’s a girl in flight to do? Last November, I arrived at the airport prepared. I was scheduled for a flight to the east coast, and with a parcel of groceries in hand–I was committed. I was not going to be purchasing any small, over-priced meals that were potentially warmed in a microwave. In hand, I had: a jar of crunch peanut butter, several pieces of whole fruit and vegetables, cottage cheese, raw hard cheese, avocado, nuts, seeds, dried fruit and dried meat. I was so pleased with my selection of nutrient-rich foods that, in theory, was going to last me the entire flight.

My bubble was burst as my parcel of food was being scanned for potential explosives or liquid content. My unopened jar of peanut butter and cottage cheese were pulled from the bag immediately. The attendant said, “These are considered liquids, you will have to throw these away”. I tried to argue that ground-peanuts are not considered a liquid, and that if the attendant would actually look at the cottage cheese in his hand, he would discover that it was actually a “dry-curd” cottage cheese (if such a thing actually exists). To my chagrin, my efforts to hold on to my food failed due to standard procedure.

A women looked at me skeptically as I tried to give her the unopened food, but it seemed shameful not to try. In the end, the best I could do was leave the unopened containers on the edge of a trashcan and board the plane hoping that the food would be eaten by someone.

This is one of the many reasons I do not enjoy flying. At the airport, personal freedom is restricted, and one’s choices are limited. This interaction started me thinking about how I might be better-prepared with my own food for flight the next time I travel. If I view the restrictions in service and the limitations as a challenge it will be interesting to note what I can get away with bringing or making myself.

This is a partial list of reasons that I am not interested in eating airplane food to begin with:

  1.  it is expensive
  2.  the size is small
  3.  there is excessive packaging
  4.  the food is not fresh
  5.  the food is often microwaved (no thanks)
  6.  the food is of poor-quality (not organic, not sustainably-sourced, not sustainably-raised, etc.)
  7.  the food leaves me hungry (what’s the point of eating, if you are still hungry in the end?)
  8.  the food tastes bad (who wants to buy food that tastes bad to begin with?)

Instead of eating airplane food, I’ve decided to commit to creating my own meals while on the plane with the nutrient-rich ingredients I bring myself. If you think picnic you have the idea. On this particular flight, and with the ingredients I had left, I was actually able to make a simple and yet tasty guacamole, that would have been considered a “liquid” had I mashed the avocado before boarding the plane. Not bad, for some of my food being spurned by airport attendants!

Guacamole recipe:

2 whole avocados

1/4 red onion

1/4 red pepper

a thin-skinned lemon

salt, pepper, cayenne to taste

Directions:

  1. Use the plastic fork or plastic knife that is provided by the airline to cut the avocado in half. Remove the pit and scoop out the avocado center. Mash the avocado content in the plastic water cup that is provided.
  2. Take out some cut onion and pepper pieces that you sliced the evening before, and mix them in with the avocado.
  3. With a plastic knife, take a whole thin-skinned lemon and slice off a section (not as difficult as you may think), squeeze the desired amount of lemon juice into your guacamole. You can use the rest of the lemon to flavor your water. If you do not have a lemon on hand, you might ask one of the flight attendants if they have any lemon or lime, as these are often served with drinks (it is, at the very least, a whole food).
  4. Mix in the salt, pepper and cayenne you brought along. Your guacamole is ready to eat!
  5. Enjoy alone or use as a dip for vegetables, tortillas, or anything else you brought to spread it on. I spread mine on some tortilla chips and added a little raw cheese!

As it stands, I will be leaving for the east coast in a few weeks, this time, I will be better-prepared and more creative with what I make. What else is there to do while on a plane for many hours?

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