Part III: Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System

When I ask clients what they want to achieve from a nutrition consultation, it is common to hear, “I want more energy”. This tells me the person needs to start with the nutrition basics and heal from the ground up.

Nutritionally, healing from the ground up is a matter of acknowledging and using appropriate building blocks that foster good health.

The building blocks are simple and few: drink pure water, eat pure food that supports your biochemical individuality (free of chemicals, additives or preservatives), breathe fresh air, and find a balance between movement and relaxation.

Factors that contribute to good health are often learned from family, friends, and society.

Factors that contribute to ill-health and interfere with the ability to use appropriate buildings blocks that foster good health are also often connected to health pattern learned from family, friends, and society.

Your life experiences and what you’ve been taught along the way has the potential to color your perspective and decision-making ability in regard to your health.

A question to consider: Are you making food choices from an emotional, mental, spiritual or intuitive place?

When you make food choices from an emotional place, you connect eating certain foods to social situations. This is where family traditions come into play, or pizza night with friends. For example, you might enjoy eating a Wendy’s cheeseburger because it is familiar and you have memories of having lunch with your Grandmother there, or you might make a certain meal because it is a traditional meal learned from family.

When you make food choices from a mental place, you rely on media to inform you about diet trends and nutrition protocols. As someone who “follows the rules” you apply what you have read or learned about nutrition from the media to your own life. An example would be someone who follows current diets like a gluten-free diet or a Paleo diet because it is part of a trend (even though these diets are great for many people).

When you make food choices from a spiritual place, you may be connected to a particular philosophy or dogma that you feel loyal too. You might add or eliminate foods based on religious/spiritual/dogmatic principle. For example, you might modify your diet as part of a religious observance or follow a particular food philosophy such as veganism.

When you make food choices from an intuitive place, you eat with intention. You listen to your hunger cues and work with the building blocks of health to sustain your body. Food choices and meal planning are based on what your body needs to eat and thrive. You pay attention to how your energy feels.

When you consider the chakras, healing from ground up begins with Root Chakra.

Do you want to learn more about the Chakra System, nutrition and the role intuition plays with your health? Friday, May 23rd is the last day to register the class, Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System. Follow this link to sign up: Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System.  

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Part II: Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System

For thousands of years, ancient medical systems such as Ayurvedic Medicine and Chinese Medicine have recognized that fine tuning energy flow is the key to maintain a healthy body, mind, and spirit. The quality of your energy, or life force, is the most important factor to consider when it is time to make some changes and improve your health.

Working with the chakras can be a useful tool to help maintain energy flow and to create much-needed balance. As an energetic super highway, the Chakra System creates a convenient blue print that has much to say about what is happening with your entire body.

When you feel sluggish, tired, depressed, overweight, constipated, bloated, or unable to make decisions in your life — these are signs that you are dealing with a foundational issue or potential dysfunction that affects the Root Chakra.

Each chakra is attached to:

Physical Health — A specific gland of the Endocrine System is associated with each chakra as well as specific organs in the body.

Emotional and Psychological Health — Certain characteristics are associated with each chakra and your personal story has much to say about how to improve the health of each chakra.

Potential Blockages and Dysfunction — What is happening with you physically, emotionally or mentally act as clues to inform you about the function of your chakras. Once you are given information you can make an informed decision about your health and take responsibility for potential blockages or dysfunction.

A Particular Color from Nature — Ayurvedic doctors counsel that we are influenced by the vibration of the food that we eat, so a particular color is thought to raise or lower your vibration (energy). A particular color from nature is attached to each chakra and has the ability to heal it.

Working with chakras is an intuitive and proactive approach to your health. When you work to incorporate chakra information with your whole body, you initiate the healing process.

Root Chakra – The Foundation

Symbolically, the Root Chakra connects you to the Earth. Your concerns about physical and material survival are addressed here. For those of you who study psychology it is the base of Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs. You cannot thrive unless your essential needs are met. If your foundation has cracks, you can expect to see dysfunction in other chakras as well.

Physically, the Root Chakra is located at the base of your spine (there are also chakras that are located in the soles of your feet). Any potential dysfunction can be connected to your bones: spinal column, legs, feet — your rectum, Immune System, Adrenal Glands and Circulatory System also show up here.

Psychologically and Emotionally, When general information about the Root Chakra is applied to your nutrition and health you are working on: trusting your food choices, body image, as well as will power and the ability to create boundaries. How you perceive the Earth is also important. Appreciation for where your food comes from as well as where and how it grows can be addressed at the Root Chakra level. Our family rituals and traditions with food are also explored here.

The Root Chakra asks us to shine light on our family of origin, our history and ultimately take responsibility for creating the changes that our health deems necessary for survival.

Some questions to consider: What did you learn from family about physical and material survival? How was money viewed in your household? Was there an abundance of food or was food scarcity a concern? Did your family care about the source of your food? Was your family interested in buying quality ingredients or growing your own food? 

Do you want to learn more about the Chakra System, nutrition and the role intuition plays with your health? Friday, May 23rd is the last day to register for the class, Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System. Follow this link to sign up: Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System.

 

 

Part I: Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System

Sound nutrition has people so confused. The media says one thing, your neighbor says another, and your doctor says something else – Why has eating a balanced diet become so complicated? Andy why have people placed the power to decide what is right for them in someone else’s hands? Is it possible that you are looking for answer from  people or using resources that are not right for you? Why is this?

As a holistic nutritionist, part of my work is to educate clients about sound nutrition, but I don’t push a particular philosophy, I always leave room for intuition and I respect what is right for you – what is your food philosophy? How has your food philosophy evolved over time as you have received new information?

When I educate clients about sound nutrition I give an array of choices – not just one nutrition model to choose from. Eating well looks different to everyone, that’s why one nutrition plan does not work for every person. I respect each person’s biochemical individuality. The client is always in the driver’s seat, as a passenger, I co-create nutrition plans that help and heal.

This June, I will be teaching a class with the Wellspring School for Healing Arts, called Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System. This class offers another choice, another food philosophy or model that may work for you. If learning information about using your intuition, exploring multiple food philosophies and learning about the Chakra System and how this information can help you lead a healthier, happier, and more productive life resonates, then I think this class will be for you.

Some of you may need a little more information. I hope to fill in the gaps in the coming weeks touching on a few questions that I’ve received so far. The following post will offer some Chakra 101.

What are the Chakras?

Practitioners of one of the oldest medical systems, Ayurveda, continue to rely on information about the Chakras to treat people, recognizing that you have to look much deeper and work from the root if you want to create real changes with health. A proactive nutrition protocol respects this as well. Health plans must treat the whole person,  improvements on the physical plane are often made when you also address what is happening emotionally, mentally, and energetically.

The Chakras are considered to be seven energy centers in the body that follow the spine connecting our physical body with our emotional, psychological, and spiritual bodies – they are interdependent – the health of one chakra depends on the health of all the others. The Chakras are known as the Root, Sacral, Solar Plexus, Heart, Throat, Third Eye and Crown Chakra.

Each chakra is considered to be a circular sphere that whirls on its own axis – the speed of each is dependant on the quality of energy (or light) that is present in our environment – our thoughts, the people in our communities the quality of our air, food, and water supply all have an effect on the health of our chakras.

A healthy chakra system is moving – the speed depends on the amount of energy you have and the quality of light has a special significance as we get much of our energy from the sun as a heat source and fuel for our natural world to grow. Food choices of the full color spectrum play a significant role in the health of our chakras because light is so significant to the health of the chakras – a color from nature is connected to each chakra.

Are your wheels spinning?

The Chakra system is interdependent relying on the body, emotions, mind and spirit to work harmoniously. If your mind is healthy you continue to think positively and move forward, if that energy is blocked, you stay right where you are, or continue to spin your metal wheels wondering what direction you should be heading in.

Each chakra has specific physical, emotional, and psychological attributes that are able to give us clues about the state of our health. When the chakras are out of balance they are considered to be overactive, under active, or blocked.

Whether you believe the chakras to be actual whirling disks in your body or you choose to view the chakras location as a metaphor to teach you about your health there is something to be learned.

If you would like to read more about my class offering or register for the class, you can do so here: Nutrition, Intuition and the Chakra System.

I welcome questions and comments from the generally curious or prospective students in the comments section below.

A Day of Renewal in Portland, Oregon

I will be co-hosting (as Eat to Live Nutrition and Tarot for the Times) a space-limited retreat called, A Day of Renewal, with Dr. Louise Rose ND of Rose Cabinet Medicine on Saturday, April 27th, from 11 AM to 5 PM.
The retreat will be a daylong event with a potpourri of relaxing and rejuvenating options such as: detoxification, energy healing, body work, water therapy, holistic nutrition, intuitive development, and stress management.
This event would make an excellent gift for someone in need of some TLC. Is it you? Don’t miss it! If you know someone who might be interested, please share this event.

A Day of Renewal at Rose Cabinet Medicine

 with Dr. Louise Rose & Traci Goodrich

 image of day of renewal             

What new seeds of possibility do you want to plant in your life this spring?         

Which areas of your health do you want to explore?

If you had more energy what would you do with it?

Are you ready for a change?

Come for a day of renewal and to rediscover what wellness feels like. 

When + Where + Cost:

Saturday, April 27th, 11 AM – 5 PM

Rose Cabinet Medicine, 2135 NE 55th Avenue, Portland, OR 97213

The total cost is $230. $115 will reserve your spot at this space-limited retreat. The remaining amount is due in full by April 15th. Contact Dr. Louise Rose to pay. 503-308-8608 Cash, check, or credit cards are accepted.

Increasing Your Milk Supply

I am teaching a free introductory class for mothers who want to increase their breast milk production using food and herbs found in their homes at the Alma Education and Movement Space, on May 11th from 6:30 until 8:30. See the specifics below!

CLASS: Increasing Your Milk Supply – One Bite at a Time FREE!

WHEN: Fri, May 11, 6:30pm – 8:30pm

WHERE: Alma Education and Movement Space, 1233 SE Stark, Portland (map)

DESCRIPTION: Do you want to know what mothers from cultures around the world have done to increase their milk supply? Join holistic nutrition consultant and traditional foods educator, Traci Goodrich, as she teaches fundamentals of postpartum nutrition and lactogenic food and herbs, Pregnant and nursing mamas and partners are encouraged to attend. Food demonstration and samples provided. Call Traci Goodrich at 503-233-7064 to register.
You need to register for the class by May 9th, if you would like to attend!

The Necessary Evils: Sugar, Salt and Fat

From the three part series,  “The Necessary Evils: Sugar, Salt and Fat”

PART I: SUGAR

BREAK THE CYCLE OF ADDICTION

When I was a child, it was common in my family to eat doughnuts for breakfast, to drink soda like it was water and to add sugar to foods that didn’t necessarily need it. By the age of 12, I was at an unhealthy weight, depressed, anxious, and emotional. My father, quite innocently, indulged my sweet tooth, and did not recognize the unfortunate consequences of a diet high in sugar, nor the very real connection between poor mental, physical and emotional health and blood sugar that was out of control. The type of sugar that I ate most frequently was high in quantity and poor in quality: refined white sugar and corn syrup.

More and more connections have been established between obesity and excess consumption of sugar, specifically corn syrup, which is often an ingredient found in the least expensive and the most processed foods. A good rule of thumb is, if you can buy the item on the shelf at your neighborhood convenience store, it’s better left there than in your stomach.

As obesity and diabetes inch closer to near epidemic status in the United States, there is more public concern and demand for information about these critical issues and what can be done to avoid them. Unfortunately, most people consume more sugar than their body’s need or can ever use.

YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT, READ THE LABEL

If you want to start reducing the amount of sugar that you consume and you do not know where to start, start at the beginning and eliminate the unhealthiest forms of sugar first: refined white sugar and corn syrup.

Corn syrup is in many items that you may not be aware of: canned soups, ketchup, peanut butter, jam, jelly, soda, boxed sweets, and many sauces. When a nutritional label indicates that there are 40 grams of sugar in a product, as is the case with a 12-ounce can of Coke, it actually means that you are drinking something with 10 teaspoons of sugar in it. If you were going to add sugar to 6 ounces of plain yogurt, you probably wouldn’t add over 6 teaspoons of sugar, which is the amount of sugar that is in a 6-ounce container of strawberry flavored Yoplait yogurt. Even a 12-ounce glass of 100% orange juice has 8 teaspoons of sugar.

It is crucial to educate yourself about sugar by reading nutritional labels, and remember that 4 grams equals 1 teaspoon of sugar. If sugar is one of the first five ingredients on a label the food is high in sugar. Recognize how much sugar you consume and sleuth out the obvious and the not-so-obvious sources of sugar. I am often surprised by some “health foods” that have a lot of sugar. Some items that come to mind are granola, cereal bars, yogurt, and even peanut butter. These items might be using a better form of sugar: such as cane sugar, maple syrup, honey, or fruit juice but it is still sugar and it has virtually the same impact on your blood sugar level.

REDUCE AND REPLACE

Replace refined sugar with something that is natural such as raw honey, 100% maple syrup or molasses. Use unrefined cane sugar in moderation, such as with special occasion baking.

Select juices, jams, or jellies that use 100% fruit and use them sparingly.

Consume whole fruit. It has less impact on your blood sugar than juice or processed sweets.

Add water to the fruit juice you do consume.

Share dessert instead of having your own.

Although I believe that it’s ok to have the occasional treat, it’s a good idea to define what moderation is. If you take small steps to replace refined sugar and reduce the amount of sugar you consume overall, you will eventually crave sugar less and break the cycle of sugar addiction. Soon, foods that are naturally sweet will satisfy the occasion craving for sugar. As you consume less sugar, you will have more energy and vitality then ever before.

A Commitment to Health and Healing with Nutritional Therapy

My Beliefs

The human body is complex, and every person’s needs are unique. No one way of eating or living is appropriate for all people, which is why no one “diet” or lifestyle is appropriate for every person. There are many shapes and sizes that are considered to be perfectly healthy. My goal as a Nutritional Therapy Practitioner (NTP) is to help people understand that what they eat affects how they feel, and often, how they think and act. Certain foods energize people, give them strength and vitality, while other foods steal this energy away, and make people feel tired, sluggish, and all too often, depressed. People who seek Nutritional Therapy want to experience improved and abundant health.

At the core of Nutritional Therapy, is the belief that traditional foods are best, and if the food that you are eating does not rot at some point, you probably should not be eating it. Traditional foods have nourished people for centuries and tradition foods will continue to nourish people into the future if we heed the wisdom that has been passed on throughout the years.

Michael Pollan, author of In Defense of Food, said that if your great-great-grandmother wouldn’t recognize it, don’t eat it.

I believe that this is sage advice.

How to be successful with Nutritional Therapy

Nutritional Therapy begins with the desire to reclaim health and lost vitality.

Nutritional Therapy is most successful when individuals are willing to transition to eating whole, nutrient-dense foods, with the knowledge that organic and hormone-free foods are the most nutritious.

Nutritional Therapy takes time and commitment. If a healthful habit takes 30 days to initiate, then an unhealthful habit will take just as long to break.

What happens during  the consultation?

As a Nutritional Therapist Practitioner, it is my job to assess each client’s overall health and to find a nutrition plan that works for the individual. The initial assessment has several steps. In the initial interview and food consultation, the client’s health concerns will be discussed and dietary suggestions will be made. The second part of the consultation consists of an evaluation of the systems of the body, where I will assess potential nutritional weaknesses in the client’s body. Nutritional weaknesses often act as roadblocks to overall health. Once these roadblocks are removed people will often experience improved health. Sometimes supplements help to remove these roadblocks, but often changes that are made to one’s diet are just as effective. We will discuss the options. Once some initial recommendations have been made, and the client begins to work with this new information or protocol, I recommend a follow up interview to assess whether or not the person feels better, and to discuss successes, challenges, or concerns with the overall plan.